Black female track star steroids

Modern Drummer called it a "guitar-fed workout," considered a "bristly rock song." [39] [40] It was also called "thrashing," completed by "whining guitar riffs." [41] Los Angeles Times applauded its "headbangin' bravado," called a "hard-hitting pop-rock track with great harmonies.". [42] [43] Time heralded its "restless beats" and "cool lyrical ferocity," thought to be among Jackson's edgier "walks on the wild side." [44] Anthony Williams of Houston Chronicle applauded it as an "angry, cautionary tale to a boy who thinks he’s got nine lives." [45] Dave Tianen of The Sentinel called its theme "a radical statement," considered a "blunt challenge to young men to turn away from gang violence." [46] It was also noted for its "heavy-metal guitar lead," portraying "a street rebel living on the edge." [47] The Daily Gazette called it "a rocker booming with guitar solos." [48] David Koen of Phoenix New Times likened it to Joan Jett , saying "Jackson proves how nasty she can really be," calling its guitar riffs "dirty" enough to induce blushing. [49] iTunes praised its "scorching guitar and fierce feline vocals." [21] Rachel Devitt of Rhapsody considered it the album's highlight, portraying Jackson as a "rocker chick." [50] Stereo Review praised it as "rakish" and "strutting," also "underscored by biting blues licks and a driving beat." [51] It was also thought to be "her most rocking song ever." [52] Elsewhere, it was declared "rock-edged" and "metal-tinged," featuring "sizzling guitar work," while The Boston Globe stated the song immortalized the superstition that some people already feel towards black cats. [53] [54] [55]

Black female track star steroids

black female track star steroids

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