Steroid injections for knee osteoarthritis

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Epidural steroid injections are commonly prescribed for patients with a disc injury or spinal arthritis causing nerve irritation, and generally consist of local anesthetic (numbing medication such as lidocaine) and cortisone (a steroid that reduces inflammation and pain). Lidocaine is often injected initially so patients experience minimal, if any, pain during the procedure. The injection may be performed by placing the needle posteriorly between the spine bones (Translaminar or interlaminar) and injecting the medicine into the space around the spinal nerves. A transforaminal ESI means the injection is placed slightly to one side of the spine, and the medicine is injected near the ruptured disc and inflamed spinal nerve. A caudal ESI is performed by placing the needle near the tailbone, and injecting the medicine into the region of the sacral nerves and lower lumbar spinal nerves. Epidural steroid injections, as well as most spinal injections, are performed using a special x-ray guidance system called fluoroscopy. This allows the doctor to immediately see an x-ray image on a television screen and inject the medicine precisely into the right spot. The procedure time is often less than 10-15 minutes.

As with any medication, there are possible side effects or risks involved.  Common risks from steroid injections include pain at the injection site, bruising due to broken blood vessels, skin discolouration and aggravation of inflammation.  Rarer risks include allergic reactions, infection, tendon rupture and serious injury to bones called necrosis.  Long term side effects (depending on frequency and dose) include thinning of skin, easy bruising, weight gain, puffiness in the face, higher blood pressure, cataract formation, and osteoporosis (reduced bone density).  Steroid injections may be given every 3-4 months but frequent injections may lead to tissue weakening at the injection site and is not recommended.  Side effects do not happen in everyone and vary from person to person.

The first day my rash appeared I saw my dermatologist who diagnosed shingles and gave me an anti-viral medicine. The rash went through the typical stages of blisters, scabs, and eventally fading in color. But , as many here have described, the pain was unbearable on my left shoulder blade, left underarm, left breast. I went on a low dose of gabapentin and nortriptyline, which I'm still on (it's about 6 weeks since my rash first appeared). Three weeks ago, my dermatologist gave me steroid shots in the spots where I told him it hurt. He numbed the skin first and his assistant also blew very cold air onto the spot while he gave me the shot. The pain of the shot wasn't too bad, really, even in my armpit. He gave me many shots. It took at least a week to 10 days to feel a reducton of pain in those spots. I returned to him a week ago for more shots in the spots that still hurt. I felt relief more quickly this time, but he also gave me lots more shots than the first time. I have another appt. with him next week. These shots have been a godsend, as I wasn't able to wear a shirt or bra for weeks due to the pain. I'm almost back to normal now. I wouldn't call it pain anymore. It's now just a feeling of minor irritation where it used to hurt like heck. I don't know why I can't find any information on the internet about these steroid shots for shingles pain. I want everyone to know about them. I also went to my family doctor once about the shingles. She prescribed the gabapentin and anti-depressant. When I asked my dermatologist why she hadn't mentioned the steroid shots, he said that she wouldn't have been trained in that. I highly recommend the steroid shots. I believe my dermatologist told me that there is also a bit of lidocaine in those shots, but I'm not sure I'm right about that.

Steroid injections for knee osteoarthritis

steroid injections for knee osteoarthritis

The first day my rash appeared I saw my dermatologist who diagnosed shingles and gave me an anti-viral medicine. The rash went through the typical stages of blisters, scabs, and eventally fading in color. But , as many here have described, the pain was unbearable on my left shoulder blade, left underarm, left breast. I went on a low dose of gabapentin and nortriptyline, which I'm still on (it's about 6 weeks since my rash first appeared). Three weeks ago, my dermatologist gave me steroid shots in the spots where I told him it hurt. He numbed the skin first and his assistant also blew very cold air onto the spot while he gave me the shot. The pain of the shot wasn't too bad, really, even in my armpit. He gave me many shots. It took at least a week to 10 days to feel a reducton of pain in those spots. I returned to him a week ago for more shots in the spots that still hurt. I felt relief more quickly this time, but he also gave me lots more shots than the first time. I have another appt. with him next week. These shots have been a godsend, as I wasn't able to wear a shirt or bra for weeks due to the pain. I'm almost back to normal now. I wouldn't call it pain anymore. It's now just a feeling of minor irritation where it used to hurt like heck. I don't know why I can't find any information on the internet about these steroid shots for shingles pain. I want everyone to know about them. I also went to my family doctor once about the shingles. She prescribed the gabapentin and anti-depressant. When I asked my dermatologist why she hadn't mentioned the steroid shots, he said that she wouldn't have been trained in that. I highly recommend the steroid shots. I believe my dermatologist told me that there is also a bit of lidocaine in those shots, but I'm not sure I'm right about that.

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